COVID-19, Social Distancing, and an Ethic of Care

Nari Kim and Lindsay Naylor

In 2020, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) disrupted life around the globe. In the United States, governors issued state of emergency orders and mandated shelter-in-place and social distancing measures. While these measures are important, they ignore the nuances of risk for vulnerable groups, such as older adults. Moreover, social distancing measures made more visible the reality that many patients in care homes often die in isolation.

Reflections on Reconfiguring Methods During COVID-19: Lessons in Trust, Partnership, and Care

Katharine McKinnon, Ann Hill, Margie Appel, Deborah Hill, Jo Caffery, Barbara Pamphilon

This paper is a set of reflections from researchers in the Center for Sustainable
Communities, University of Canberra, drawing out emerging lessons from the process
of re-configuring research methods during COVID-19. The pandemic has presented
new spaces of negotiation, struggle, and interdependence within research projects and
research teams. It has left researchers often uncertain about how to do their work
effectively. At the same time, it has opened up opportunities to re-think how researchers

Food for people in place

Kelly Dombroski, Gradon Diprose, Emma Sharp, Rebekah Graham, Louise Lee, Matthew Scobie, Sophie Richardson, Alison Watkins, Rosemarie Martin-Nueninger

The COVID-19 pandemic and associated response have brought food security into sharp focus for many New Zealanders. The requirement to “shelter in place” for eight weeks nationwide, with only “essential services” operating, affected all parts of the New Zealand food system. The nationwide full lockdown highlighted existing inequities and created new challenges to food access, availability, affordability, distribution, transportation, and waste management.