Diverse Economies of Care-full healthcare: Banking and Sharing Human Milk

Lindsay Naylor

Contemporary systems of healthcare and other industries are largely defined by their neoliberal, capitalist character. However, this parochial approach to understanding the political economy of healthcare misses the myriad activities that make up the “care” in healthcare. Receiving care is not isolated to capitalist exchanges, nor is it unquestionably tied to the neoliberal marketplace. There exist diverse economies of care within, outside, and alongside neoliberal capitalist ones. Moreover, there are multiple means by which we may define care that are often overlooked.

COVID-19, Social Distancing, and an Ethic of Care

Nari Kim and Lindsay Naylor

In 2020, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) disrupted life around the globe. In the United States, governors issued state of emergency orders and mandated shelter-in-place and social distancing measures. While these measures are important, they ignore the nuances of risk for vulnerable groups, such as older adults. Moreover, social distancing measures made more visible the reality that many patients in care homes often die in isolation.

Troubling care in the neonatal intensive care unit

Lindsay Naylor, et al.

The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a site of medical treatment for premature and critically ill infants. It is a space populated by medical teams and their patients, as well as parents and family. Each actor in this space negotiates providing and practicing care. In this paper, we step away from thinking about the NICU as only a space of medical care, instead, taking an anti-essentialist view, re-read care as multiple, while also troubling the community of care that undergirds it.

The Body as a Site of Care: Food and Lactating Bodies in the U.S.

Lindsay Naylor

The breast/chestfeeding body is a site of intense politics and power relations in the United States. Hardly a week passes without an incident in the news of a person being publically shamed, or unlawfully asked to change their behavior while using their body to feed their infant in public. Lactating bodies are deemed out-of-place. Simultaneously, birth-parents are judged on their infant feeding practices, with those who do not nurse cast outside of the biologically deterministic ‘good mother’ role. This framing causes the nursing or not-nursing body to become a site of debate.

Reflections on Reconfiguring Methods During COVID-19: Lessons in Trust, Partnership, and Care

Katharine McKinnon, Ann Hill, Margie Appel, Deborah Hill, Jo Caffery, Barbara Pamphilon

This paper is a set of reflections from researchers in the Center for Sustainable
Communities, University of Canberra, drawing out emerging lessons from the process
of re-configuring research methods during COVID-19. The pandemic has presented
new spaces of negotiation, struggle, and interdependence within research projects and
research teams. It has left researchers often uncertain about how to do their work
effectively. At the same time, it has opened up opportunities to re-think how researchers

Food rescue as collective care

Gradon Diprose, Louise Lee

Recent research into waste has moved beyond focusing on individual behaviour change to the wider practices, systems, and social norms that construct and perpetuate waste. Running alongside this work on waste, community economy scholars have been exploring how communities form around and care for commons.

Caring labour: redistributing care work

Kelly Dombroski

In this chapter, Kelly lays out the case for proliferating and valuing caring labour, so that all kinds of different people might share in it.

Ethnography in and with bodies

Katharine McKinnon
Kelly Dombroski

In this article, Katharine and Kelly reflect on the role of the body in ethnographic research, suggesting some questions we might consider as we seek to create caring academic communities supporting each other in ethnographic work.

The 'diverse economies' of applied theatre

Molly Mullen

Some of the perennial tensions in applied theatre arise from the ways in which practice is funded or financed. They include the immediate material pressures and pragmatic dilemmas faced by theatre makers on the ground and the struggle to secure the resources needed to produce and sustain work or to negotiate the dynamics and demands of particular funding relationships. In the applied theatre literature, there are many examples of groups and organizations that have compromised their political, pedagogic, artistic or ethical principles to make their work economically viable.