Asset-based and citizen-led development: Using a diffracted power lens to analyze the possibilities and challenges

Alison Mathie
Jenny Cameron
Katherine Gibson

Asset Based Community Development or Asset-Based and Citizen-Led Development (ABCD) is being used in a range of development contexts. Some researchers have been quick to dismiss ABCD as part of the neoliberal project and an approach that perpetuates unequal power relations. This paper uses a diffracted power analysis to explore the possibilities associated with ABCD as well as the challenges.

Care-full Community Economies

Kelly Dombroski
Stephen Healy
Katharine McKinnon
Image of book cover, feminist political ecology and the politics of care

For this chapter, we reviewed as much Community Economies literature on care as we could, trawling this site for anything relevant to care. Using the framing questions 'who cares?' 'what do we care for?' and 'how to do we care?' we present an imagining of what constitutes the collective, the commons we care for, and how we might care through research.

Community economies in Monsoon Asia: Keywords and key reflections

Katherine Gibson
Rini Astuti
Michelle Carnegie
Alanya Chalernphon
Kelly Dombroski
Agnes Ririn Haryani
Ann Hill
B Kehi
Lisa Law
Isaac Lyne
Andrew McGregor
Katharine McKinnon
Andrew McWilliam
Fiona Miller
C Ngin
Darlene Occeña‐Gutierrez
Lisa Palmer
Pryor Placino
Mercy Rampengan
L Than Wynn
I Wianti Nur
Sarah Wright

The paper has been collaboratively written with co‐researchers across Southeast Asia and represents an experimental mode of scholarship that aims to advance a post‐development agenda.This paper introduces the project of documenting keywords of place‐based community economies in Monsoon Asia. It extends Raymond William’s cultural analysis of keywords into a non‐western context and situates this discursive approach within a material semiotic framing.

Hybrid Activist Collectives: Reframing mothers' environmental and caring labour

Kelly Dombroski

Part of a special issue 'Activists with(out) organisation' edited by Richard White and Patricia Wood, this article argues that the environmental and caring labour of mothers within the home is a kind of collective economic and environmental activism, where the collective is hybrid human and more than human. I connect the work mothers do in the home with the kinds of shared concerns community economies activists gather around.

Radical equality, care and labour in a community economy

Gradon Diprose

The reproductive and care work predominantly undertaken by women has historically been undervalued in traditional measures of the economy. However, calls for more work, or better work for women (and men) doesn’t necessarily solve the issues surrounding waged labour such as zero hour contracts, the ‘double work day’, and other forms of increasing precarity and competition. In this article I explore how alternative forms of labour exchange in the Wellington Timebank provide one way in which subjects can partially operate outside the waged economy.

Negotiating interdependence and anxiety in community economies

Gradon Diprose

The burgeoning literature on diverse and community economies has been relatively hopeful, exploring how people learn, enact new and reclaim other ways of meeting their needs outside of capitalist practices. For good reasons, much of this work has sought to avoid a conventional critical-leftist orientation, instead adopting what Gibson-Graham call a ‘weak theory’ approach ‘that welcomes surprise, entertains hope, makes connection, tolerates coexistence and offers care for the new’.