Community economies in Monsoon Asia: Keywords and key reflections

Katherine Gibson
Rini Astuti
Michelle Carnegie
Alanya Chalernphon
Kelly Dombroski
Agnes Ririn Haryani
Ann Hill
B Kehi
Lisa Law
Isaac Lyne
Andrew McGregor
Katharine McKinnon
Andrew McWilliam
Fiona Miller
C Ngin
Darlene Occeña‐Gutierrez
Lisa Palmer
Pryor Placino
Mercy Rampengan
L Than Wynn
I Wianti Nur
Sarah Wright

The paper has been collaboratively written with co‐researchers across Southeast Asia and represents an experimental mode of scholarship that aims to advance a post‐development agenda.This paper introduces the project of documenting keywords of place‐based community economies in Monsoon Asia. It extends Raymond William’s cultural analysis of keywords into a non‐western context and situates this discursive approach within a material semiotic framing.

Beyond the birth wars: diverse assemblages of care

Kelly Dombroski
Katharine McKinnon
Stephen Healy

In this article, we argue that paying attention to the diverse assemblages of care enables us to go beyond simplistic natural versus medical models of birth and maternity care. We draw on interviews with women in New Zealand.

Gender Equality and Economic Empowerment in the Solomon Islands and Fiji: a Place-based Approach

K. McKinnon, M. Carnegie, K. Gibson and C. Rowland

The economic empowerment of women is emerging as a core focus of both economic
development and gender equality programs internationally. At the same time there is
increasing importance placed on measuring outcomes and quantifying progress towards
gender and development goals. These trends raise significant questions around how well
gender differences are understood, especially in economies dominated by the informal sector
and characterised by a highly gendered division of labour, as is the case in many Pacific

Reimagining Livelihoods: Life beyond Economy, Society, and Environment

Ethan Miller
Reimagining Livelihoods (cover image)

Much of the debate over sustainable development revolves around how to balance the competing demands of economic development, social well-being, and environmental protection. “Jobs vs. environment” is only one of the many forms that such struggles take. But what if the very terms of this debate are part of the problem?

Reimagining Livelihoods argues that the “hegemonic trio” of economy, society, and environment not only fails to describe the actual world around us but poses a tremendous obstacle to enacting a truly sustainable future.

Making Other Worlds Possible: Performing Diverse Economies

Gerda Roelvink
Kevin St. Martin
J.K. Gibson-Graham (Eds)
Making Other Worlds Possible

What exactly constitutes an economy? Making Other Worlds Possible brings together a compelling range of projects inspired by the diverse economies research agenda pioneered by J. K. Gibson-Graham. Firmly establishing diverse economies as a field of research, Making Other Worlds Possible outlines an array of different ways scholars are enacting economies that privilege ethical negotiation and a politics of possibility.

Post-industrial Pathways for a 'Single Industry Resource Town': a Community Economies Approach

Janet Newbury
Katherine Gibson

Although communities are constantly undergoing processes of becoming the Powell River community on Canada’s Pacific coast is in a unique transitional moment when it comes to possibilities for post-industrial economic pathways. With the downsizing of its main industry and employer over the past 3 decades, community members are currently exploring a diverse range of economic possibilities that extend beyond strictly capitalist options.

Mapping Economic Diversity in the First World: The Case of Fisheries

Kevin St. Martin

This paper challenges the ways in which the First World/Third World binary, coupled with a "capitalocentric" discourse of economic development, limit possibilities for economies of community, cooperation and participation. Fisheries are used as an example to argue that undermining the presence of capitalism in the First World and making space for that which has been excluded (for example, community-based and territorial fisheries) requires a new economic and spatial imaginary.